D.I.G. Fellows Nicole Riesenberger and Matthew Lincoln Land Exciting Work to Start Their Careers

D.I.G. Fellows Nicole Riesenberger and Matthew Lincoln Land Exciting Work to Start Their Careers

Nicole Riesenberger, D.I.G. Fellow for the past two years, and Matthew Lincoln, D.I.G. Fellow in 2013, both have successfully (and brilliantly!) defended dissertations this semester. Matthew's dissertation, "Modeling the Network of Dutch and Flemish Print Production, 1550–1750," employed quantitative (computational) methods to analyze large sets of data made available by the British Museum and Rijksmuseum of their vast collection of European prints from the period. Matthew's careful and thoughtful work opens up new scholarly paths in the study not only of European printmaking but in the field of Art History writ large, and his potent intellectual activity has attracted the interest of the Getty Institute, where Matthew will begin work this summer.

Over the past two years as a year-round D.I.G. Fellow, Nicole has undertaken a number of projects exploring the potential of digital tools and methods to positively impact the field of Art History. Her innovative and ground-breaking use of Omeka + Neatline as a platform for an online class in Fifteenth-Century Italian Art earned her much notice and an invitation to speak at a panel at CAA this past February. This year Nicole has worked as part of a team to develop a suite of Augmented Reality interventions for an exhibition at Riversdale House Museum, "some of the finest paintings in America...". Her wonderful work has positioned her well: in July Nicole will begin a year at the Phillips Collection as the first ever Post-Doctoral Fellow in Virtual Culture, where she will pursue a project building on her many experiences here in the Collaboratory.

Congratulations Matt and Nicole, and much success to you in your new careers! Both the Getty and the Phillips are fortunate to have you.